December 2018


PLANNING: THE OLD POST OFFICE CHETTON

Reconsultation due to Amendment on application 18/03091/FUL – The Old Post Office


Proposal: Replacement of existing bungalow with 1 / 1.5 storey four bedroom dwelling and associated landscaping (amended description and plans)

Neighbour Consultation Expiry DateFri 11 Jan 2019
Standard Consultation Expiry DateFri 11 Jan 2019

For details visit https://pa.shropshire.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=summary&keyVal=PBAY2ZTDMJK00


Closure of Shropshire Council Recycling Bring Sites

Background

Bring banks are currently provided at 120 sites across Shropshire by Shropshire Council and Veolia, to enable people to recycle household waste including cans, glass, paper, clothing and drinks cartons.

Shropshire council is proposing to remove the bring bank sites to help reduce fly-tipping and littering, to increase recycling rates, and to save money, as outlined below.

Savings

As a result of substantial Government funding reductions, they need to significantly reduce their budget and make unprecedented changes to our services.

It’s estimated that removing the bring sites would save the council around £230,000 a year, money that would then be put towards the provision of other vital services.

The savings would come from no longer needing to empty the banks or maintain and manage the sites.

Inappropriate use of the bring bank sites

Inappropriate use of the banks is increasing, and the sites are experiencing three main issues:

  • People placing the wrong materials in the banks.
  • People leaving general household waste alongside the banks.
  • Businesses using the sites to dump trade waste.

Putting the wrong material in a bank causes the waste in the bank to become contaminated, meaning that it can’t then be sent for recycling.

Waste left alongside the banks is also classed as fly-tipping, which is illegal and could result in prosecution. It also costs the council time and money to clear and dispose of fly-tipped waste.

Bring sites are for household waste only and any business should have its own commercial arrangements in place for removal of any recycling or residual waste.

Fall in use of – and need for – the sites

There has been a steady decline in the amount of waste left at the sites since the introduction and development of kerbside recycling collections.

Bring banks were once the only way residents could recycle anything. However, a wide range of materials can now be recycled using the kerbside collection service, meaning there is now much less need to use a bring bank.

In addition, around 20 different materials can be recycled at each of Shropshire’s five household recycling centres.

The regional/national situation

A number of other councils have already removed their recycling bring sites, including Telford and Wrekin Council

Increasing household recycling

As mentioned above, putting the wrong material in a bank causes the waste in the bank to become contaminated, meaning that it can’t then be sent for recycling. By removing the banks and encouraging people to recycle from the kerbside or at a household recycling centre, it is anticipated that the amount of household waste sent for recycling will rise.

What Shropshire Council are proposing?

Shropshire residents are being asked for their views about plans to remove Shropshire Council owned recycling bring bank sites in the Shropshire Council area, as part of a six-week consultation that has recently started.

The proposals don’t affect banks provided on private land/by private organisations.

Please refer to the Shropshire Council for more details and how to comment on the proposal.


PCC Proposes Additional 115 Officers for West Mercia

Police and Crime Commissioner John Campion is proposing to add a further 115 police officers to West Mercia’s ranks as part of future budget plans.

The extra recruits would be additional to the PCC’s previous commitment to increase officer numbers. If the proposals go ahead, it would take West Mercia Police’s establishment up to around 2,150 officers. The highest level the force has seen since 2012.

The plan is part of the Commissioner’s budget proposals for the coming years. The investment would be funded by an increase in central grant funding from Government, as well as an increase in council tax of around £1.63 per month for the average household in 2019/20.

John Campion said: “I have listened to feedback from our communities in West Mercia who have been very consistent: People want more police officers, and they want to see them out on the streets, tackling crime and keeping us safe.”

“I believe my budget proposals deliver on that. It ensures the additional capacity for our hard-working police to deliver an even better service to communities, as well as an increase in dedicated resources for rural crime.”

“I promised I would ensure the public’s money is spent as efficiently as possible  before asking for any more, and have delivered on that promise with the lowest council tax increases in England and Wales in the last two years. With a clear commitment to invest this extra resource directly into additional frontline officers, I hope the communities of West Mercia will support my proposals”.

A consultation on the draft budget has now started, and will close on 20th January 2019.

Details can be found on the PCC’s website – www.westmercia-pcc.gov.uk